Bill of Rights

On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States therefore proposed to the state legislatures 12 amendments to the Constitution that met arguments most frequently advanced against it. The first two proposed amendments, which concerned the number of constituents for each Representative and the compensation of Congressmen, were not ratified. Articles 3 to 12, however, ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures, constitute the first 10 amendments of the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights.

 

 

Issue #1 - Abolish the IRS

There has never been a better time or more reasons to move to a fair flat tax. “We ought to abolish the IRS and instead move to a simple flat tax, where the average American can fill out our taxes on a postcard,” Senator Ted Cruz said last week on Fox News. “Put down how much you earned, put down a deduction for charitable contributions, for home mortgage and how much you owe. It ought to be just a simple one-page postcard, and take the agents, the bureaucracy out of Washington and limit the power of government.”



Issue #2 - Abolish the Department of Education

Put parents back in charge of their children's education by abolishing the Dept. of Education and put educational responsibility back at the State level where it should be. The 1996 GOP platform read, “the Federal government has no constitutional authority to be involved in school curricula or to control jobs in the market place. This is why we will abolish the Department of Education, end federal meddling in our schools, and promote family choice at all levels of learning.”



Issue #3 - Abolish the EPA

We need to get businesses growing again by abolishing the EPA whose regulations are killing business. Many conservatives have recently suggested that the EPA is too powerful and needs to be reined in to protect our freedom and our economy. Some, like former presidential candidate Herman Cain, have even suggested that we should abolish the EPA. In his words, it is “out of control”, and he suggests we “start all over.”



Issue #4 - Dismantle Prism inside NSA - Abolish the Patriot Act

We need to protect our civil rights, liberty and freedom from government encroachment by abolishing the Patriot Act and protecting our right to privacy. Our mission is to abolish the Patriot Act. In 2008, 64 million people voted for a candidate who promised them he would restore our civil rights. Since that didn't work, we will lobby congress and the senate directly, as the people of the state, in order to get this act repealed at whatever level of government intervention that may be necessary.



Issue #5 - Dismantle Homeland Security

The Department of Homeland Security is an unconstitutional and rogue organization which is permeated with corruption from top to bottom (including the TSA with perverted gropers). DHS needs to be taken down brick by brick and its employees need to go and find useful professions and stop harassing and preparing for war with the American public, who it jokingly purports to serve. The Department of Homeland Security is an unconstitutional police force which exists in violation in posse comitatus. With its recent 2.2 rounds of hollow point ammunition it purchased, they have enough ammo to wage war against the American people for 25 years.



Issue #6 - Get Us Out of the United Nations

Get Us Out of the United Nations and get the United Nations OUT OF THE UNITED STATES!



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BillofRights

During the debates on the adoption of the Constitution, its opponents repeatedly charged that the Constitution as drafted would open the way to tyranny by the central government. Fresh in their minds was the memory of the British violation of civil rights before and during the Revolution. They demanded a “bill of rights” that would spell out the immunities of individual citizens. Several state conventions in their formal ratification of the Constitution asked for such amendments; others ratified the Constitution with the understanding that the amendments would be offered.

On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States therefore proposed to the state legislatures 12 amendments to the Constitution that met arguments most frequently advanced against it. The first two proposed amendments, which concerned the number of constituents for each Representative and the compensation of Congressmen, were not ratified. Articles 3 to 12, however, ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures, constitute the first 10 amendments of the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights.

Bill of Rights

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment II

A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment III

No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

Amendment VII

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

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